Storts Market

by Lesley Storts


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Lorraine Turner’s Calico Horses Fabric and Pincushions

Last fall, I drove out west with my daughter Lucy for her return back to college. While visiting in Utah, I made a trip to the The Quilter’s Lodge. Have you been there? It is a beautiful store as well as a venue to provide retreats for quilters. While browsing through all of the fabric, I found an interesting and colorful line. The fabric artist, Lorraine Turner, was new to me, and for good reason – she’s a new artist for Free Spirit Fabrics. Her first line, Calico Horses, had several prints that I felt would work well as pincushions.

The art throughout the fabric required planning for various cuts and matching up with different sizes of glass. I was originally going to use the large white milk glass hobnail ashtray, but the glass is so shallow that I didn’t really like the way the pincushion looked in that glass. So I found another large ashtray. I really like the finished product and feel like the glass complements the print.

Being able to capture the beautiful faces of three horses was a bonus!

Succulent Surprise was one of my favorite prints in this line. The saturated colors spanning the rainbow worked well with larger cuts, such as the one above in Ittala glass. The fabric is beautiful coming through the bottom of this interesting glass.

Hunting for small cuts of the succulent fabric was enjoyable for the salt cellar glass.

I was drawn to the Birdseye Mustang print because of its whimsy and variety of colors. Using a colored piece of glass works well to highlight the blue within the print as well as showcase the glass.

Pincushion Pals made with Lorraine’s fabric.

The glass color of the salt cellar below is a deep red, possibly “brick red”. Finding a snippet of fabric that shows off the glass and fabric at the same time requires patience in waiting for the right piece of fabric. I leave pieces of glass sitting out in my workspace waiting for inspiration. It’s surprising how many times I have a piece of glass there and happen to lay down a piece of fabric and the two seem like perfect companions.

The cut of fabric came from a cactus that was in the Calico Horses print. The picture below is the cactus but glued onto the bottom of the pincushion of the large ashtray. It’s easy to see the beautiful strokes of color used in the red glass salt cellar from this cut of fabric.

The Lupine Valley print has saturated colors of violet and periwinkle with touches of green and pale pink. This print is beautiful! The gentle scalloped edge of the clear pedestal glass seemed like a perfect match with this fabric.

This print also works well for smaller fussy cuts.

This batch of pincushions have all been sent to new homes. Little pieces of art from Lorraine and I have been sent all over the world! I had orders from Australia, Finland (a first for me), and from all across the U.S. Making the pincushions and matching pins is such a pleasure. I am grateful and happy that I’m not the only one who enjoys them!

Happy quilting and sewing! ▶︎ ▶︎ ▶︎


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Uranium Glass Pincushions

I’m fascinated by uranium glass, sometimes called vaseline glass due to its yellow color. Officially, it is uranium glass because it has powdered uranium mixed in when the glass is being produced. I just think it’s kind of magical.

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Anna Maria Horner + Amber Lace Indiana Glass

A few months ago I made a quick stop after work at the Volunteers of America Thrift Store in Pickerington, Ohio. I found many pieces of glass that day including this one…

It can be challenging to make deep dish pincushions so I left this piece at the store. Fast forward one week later at a different thrift store and I found…

In my years of glass hunting, this is the first time I remember finding this Indiana lace glass and then finding it twice in a short period of time! The red one was half the price so I figured I would take a chance on it and see if I could make a pincushion out of it. Upon closer inspection of the glass, I noticed that the red coloring was peeling off in various places and I remembered the other one I found was amber. I decided to see if I could clean off the red film.

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Pincushion Pal

While on the constant hunt for glass through thrifting and antiquing, I find all kinds of interesting and unique pieces. At times, I do not even know the intended purpose of a piece. I buy unusual pieces with the thought that I may use it eventually. The ceramic glass that inspired the pincushion pal was purchased within the last couple of years and I had it for many months before deciding what to do with it.

Lucy and I thought it might be fun to create a little caddy that could be used for handwork. I mocked one up with the original glass.

After creating the pincushion and many discussions, Lucy and I thought this was a great addition to the pincushions we make so I started hunting for more glass pieces like this. While searching, I finally discovered the origin of the piece. The three holed ceramic dish is the base of a condiment set for a jelly jar and salt & pepper. I searched and found some whole sets on Ebay. I bought one but the base broke during shipping so I only have the jelly jar and salt & pepper.

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Pincushions and Hiking – What they have in common

My family and I went hiking and camping this past weekend. We decided to visit, for the first time, Brandywine Falls, then drive south and camp at Mohican state park. I’ve camped and hiked in Ohio many times. After so many hikes, I sometimes wonder if there really is something new to see here where I live. We were delighted with the beauty of the hike, campground and the surrounding area. It was good to get away and have a new experience.

I was thinking about our camping trip and comparing it to making pincushions. There is joy in the familiar as well as excitement in the new and undiscovered. In hiking, that can be an interesting bridge, a scenic view of a river, or a waterfall.

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»Collecting Buttons«

Buttons. A necessary sewing and clothing accessory but probably not something most people think about. As a quilter, I rarely made anything with buttons prior to making pincushions. Once Lucy and I started making pincushions, we became very interested in buttons. We have built our button stash buying at big box craft and sewing stores, antiquing, thrifting, garage sales, and eBay.

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»Patty Young Fabric and Pincushions«

My latest batch of pincushions was made using Patty Young‘s fabric line, Lucy’s Garden, by Riley Blake Designs. In an Instagram post, Patty talked about her inspiration for this colorful line. I realized after reading about Patty’s inspiration, that there is a definite ‘art deco’ feel to the prints in this fabric. That element is so appealing to me and probably one reason I really like this line. In addition, I have a daughter named Lucy who was named after 2 grandmothers – so I really like that name.

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»Robin Pickens Fabric and Pincushions«

Fabric designer and quilt pattern maker Robin Pickens has created several lines of fabric with Moda Fabrics. I used fabric from Painted Meadow, Dandi Annie, and Dear Mum to create this batch of pincushions.

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»Sharon Holland Floral Print in Reclaimed Glass Pincushion«

Reclaim – to retrieve or recover

When Lucy and I first started making pincushions, we frequented many antique shops hunting for just the right salt cellars. Over time, we started noticing other small dishes and finally ventured into different pieces to test if they would work. Ashtrays are a very common find. Some of the ashtrays we have found are made in beautiful patterns with interesting glass. Reclaiming and repurposing the glass spurs our imaginations and provides inspiration for creating.

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